2024-06-03 12:06:38

The FCC says illegal devices that block cell phone signals could pose a security risk.


The FCC has noticed a rise in people selling "jammers." The devices can block cell phone calls, text messages, Wi-Fi networks and GPS systems and could be used to cause chaos in public places.


The small, battery-powered devices can be used to create "blind spots" in a small area (usually about 30 feet) and have been used by movie theaters, restaurants and schools to prevent people from using their phones. But they can also cut off 911 calls, interfere with navigation near airports and have been used to jam radio communications near police stations. FCC officials say they have noticed an increase in the flow of jammers, which are banned by federal law, into the U.S. Many of the cheaper versions, which sell for as little as $25, are imported from Asia, according to the agency.



It is illegal to sell, advertise, use or import jammers under the Communications Act of 1934, which prohibits blocking radio communications in public.


Earlier this week, the FCC issued subpoenas to eight individuals and companies that posted ads for jammers on Craigslist.


The FCC said cities including Orlando, Philadelphia, Austin, Mississippi, Charlotte, North Carolina, Washington, D.C., Cincinnati and Corpus Christi, Texas, advertised jammers on the site. Officials said they do not believe the cases are related.


"Simply posting an ad for a signal jammers on a site like Craigslist.org is a violation of federal law. Signal jammers are contraband for a reason," Michele Ellison, director of the FCC's enforcement bureau, said in a statement. "One person's moment of peace or privacy could jeopardize the safety and well-being of others."


According to the citations, most sellers advertised the jammers as a way to take an "undisturbed nap" on the bus, quiet a classroom or keep your area "free of interference," without mentioning the more nefarious uses the devices could be used for.


"We are increasingly concerned that individual consumers operating jammer devices do not appear to understand the serious consequences of using jammers," one of the citations read. "Instead, these operators mistakenly believed that their illegal operations were a matter of personal convenience or should be excused."


But the FCC said at least one seller appeared to know that jammers were contraband.


Keith Grabowski allegedly advertised on Philadelphia Craigslist for sale a "cell phone blocker, wifi blocker" for $300. In his ad, he said that "due to the nature of this item, we are revealing very few details," that the jammer was "not a toy," and that "I just wanted to get rid of it as quickly as possible."


"The nature of the ad suggests that Mr. Grabowski knew about the sensitive and/or illegal nature of the equipment he was selling on Craigslist," the citation reads.


People who receive the ticket have 15 days to remove the ad from the site and provide the FCC with information about where the jammer was purchased and to whom it was sold. Simply posting an ad for the sale of a jammer could result in a fine of more than $100,000.


The FCC has set up a "jammer tip line" for people to report to the agency people who may be selling or using jammers.


"We intend to take increasingly tough enforcement action against offenders," Ellison said. "If we find you selling or operating a jammer, you will be punished."







コメント数:(0) カテゴリ:fcc jamming  12:06:38
2024-05-30 12:21:51

The individual who fitted a laser jamming device in his commercial vehicle to evade speeding fines has received a suspended prison term, been instructed to pay a fine of £3000, and subjected to a two-month curfew.


Jason Moore was convicted by a jury at Swansea Crown Court for obstructing justice by installing a Laser Star jamming device on a VW Transporter van to obstruct a laser speed camera operator from Dyfed-Powys Police in determining the vehicle's speed.


James Hartson, the prosecutor, informed the court that in September 2018, the van was observed traveling at a high rate of speed as it neared the speed camera near Nantyci Showground on the A40, St Clears, heading towards Camarthen.


The camera operator encountered an error message while trying to measure the speed of the vehicle. Despite this, the operator had received training from Road Safety Support experts to identify the specific conditions that could trigger such an error message.


Dyfed-Powys Police, as part of Road Safety Support, enlisted the expertise of Steve Callaghan, a forensic video analyst and laser jammers specialist employed by the company.


Mr. Callaghan received a copy of the video and verified the presence of a suspicious device in the footage. Additionally, he observed that the laser signal jammers emitted light from the van's grille while error messages were being displayed by the laser speedmeter.


Following Mr. Callaghan's initial assessment and recommendations to Dyfed-Powys Police, the van was retrieved in order to conduct testing on the device and gather evidence.


A comprehensive report was compiled detailing the examination results and the circumstances surrounding the incident, during which the speed could not be determined. Road Safety Support determined that the van was traveling at a speed of 72 mph, exceeding its maximum permitted speed of 60 mph.


Mr. Moore stated that he was unaware of the Laser Star jamming system's ability to interfere with the speed measurement feature of a police speedmeter. He asserted that he purchased the device specifically for its parking sensor function.


Mr. Moore selected David Winstanley, a former police collision investigator, who asserted his proficiency in laser and video systems, to serve as his expert witness.



Mr. Winstanley emphasized that the Laser Star should be marketed as a 'parking sensor' rather than being viewed primarily as a laser jamming device.


Mr. Callaghan clarified that utilizing a laser beam for identifying parking obstacles was completely unsuitable and mostly ineffective. He pointed out that a parking sensor does not have to be set to disrupt a laser speedmeter in any circumstance. Additionally, the Laser Star is advertised as being able to disrupt speed cameras in its instructions and marketing materials, which is not a feature of a parking sensor.


Mr. Moore further mentioned in his explanation that the security firm he was employed by required staff to cover the costs of any harm inflicted on company vehicles. He argued that he installed the device to minimize the likelihood of damage.


Moore was convicted by a jury and received a sentence at Swansea Crown Court on October 18, 2021.


Judge Vosper QC deemed Moore's defense as baseless, expressing no astonishment over the jury's dismissal of it.


Moore received a suspended 32-week custodial sentence, which will remain in effect for a period of 2 years. Additionally, he has been instructed to settle costs and fines amounting to £3,000, and a curfew lasting two months has been imposed upon him.


Can police tell if you have a laser jammer?


The utilization of a lidar gun by the police, directed towards a vehicle, will result in the device displaying either "no response" or cosine error. In the event of such an error, the police will be unable to determine whether the vehicle is equipped with a laser jammer or if they are simply not targeting the vehicle accurately. Consequently, this grants the driver an opportunity to modify their speed before the police can retrieve the data once more.


Since police need to be stationary and able to see a vehicle at close range without cover for lidar to work properly, if police receive a false response the first time they fire their lidar gun, the targeted driver will likely have time to adjust his speed when out of range. Lidar is most often used by motorcycle police or identifiable patrol cars, who use it most effectively on major roads, which limits when and where they can be used. In the case of heavy traffic, the police lidar gun is very effective at focusing on the vehicle and instantly calculating its speed, distance and direction.



コメント数:(0) カテゴリ:fcc jamming  12:21:51
2024-05-25 11:52:37

A laser jammer is a device designed to produce a "no response" or cosine error when a police officer directs a laser radar gun towards a vehicle. By displaying this error, the laser radar gun fails to provide any indication to the police officer whether the vehicle is equipped with a laser jammers or if their aim is simply off target.



A laser signal jammers is a tool that produces a "no response" or cosine error signal when a law enforcement officer directs a laser radar gun towards a vehicle. This error signal prevents the police officer from determining whether the vehicle is using a laser jammer or if they are not targeting the vehicle accurately.


How to jam police lasers?


In order to counteract the effects of a laser, it is essential for the front laser jammers to safeguard the headlights, license plate, and the reflective surfaces in their vicinity. Conversely, at the rear, the license plate and tail lights become the main focal points. Additionally, the center high-mounted stop light, backup lights, and vertical reflective surfaces are also susceptible. Surprisingly, even a spare tire/wheel assembly mounted on the tailgate can be targeted, as demonstrated by our successful attempt at hitting a Jeep Wrangler's aluminum spare wheel from a distance of 2,500 feet.


Can you install a laser jammer on your car?


California Vehicle Code Section 28150 (Division 12: Equipment of Vehicles, Chapter 5: Other Equipment, Article 17: Jamming Devices) states the following:


(a) No vehicle shall be equipped with any device that is designed for, or is capable of, jamming, scrambling, neutralizing, disabling, or otherwise interfering with radar, laser, or any other electronic device used by a law enforcement agency to measure the speed of moving objects.


(b) No person shall use, buy, possess, manufacture, sell, or otherwise distribute any device that is designed for jamming, scrambling, neutralizing, disabling, or otherwise interfering with radar, laser, or any other electronic device used by a law enforcement agency to measure the speed of moving objects.


(c) Except as provided in subdivision (d), a violation of subdivision (a) or (b) is an infraction.


(d) When a person possesses four or more devices in violation of subdivision (b), the person is guilty of a misdemeanor.


(e) Notwithstanding any other provision of law, a person who has a valid federal license for operating the devices described in this section may transport one or more of those devices if the license is carried in the vehicle transporting the device at all times when the device is being transported.


Can police radar measure speeds or more than one vehicle?


Police radars mounted on the dashboard have the capability to detect the speed of multiple vehicles simultaneously, often up to two.


Presently, radar technology allows for the simultaneous targeting of multiple vehicles, enabling the identification of the fastest vehicle in a group as well as the vehicle with the emest radar signal reflection. However, visual determination by the officer is still necessary to determine the fastest vehicle among those targeted.





コメント数:(0) カテゴリ:fcc  11:52:37
2024-05-24 12:25:39

In 2011, the Payson Police Department believed they were acquiring a cell phone jammers from a government program supplying surplus military equipment to law enforcement agencies. However, they ended up with a smokescreen device from a U.S. Navy ship.


“The ‘Electronic Countermeasures’ were supposed to be cell phone jamming devices. However, what was sent were smoke machines off of a naval ship,” Chief of Police Ronald Tischer said in an email to Arizona Mirror. “So, we are in the process of sending them back. They were never used and have been in storage since 2011.”


The Mirror reached out to the Payson Police Department after analyzing data published by the Defense Logistics Agency about military equipment sent to local law enforcement agencies across the country. The department obtained two items listed as “electronic countermeasures” in 2011 both valued at roughly $4,800.


Company offering cell, drone and other jammers is fined $35 million


Despite the possibility of not recovering the fine, the Federal Communications Commission announced yesterday that it has imposed a penalty forfeiture order of $34.9 million on Chinese electronics manufacturer and online retailer C.T.S. Technology for selling signal jamming devices to American consumers.


Radio frequency transmitters known as "jammers" are deliberately designed to obstruct, disturb, or impede wireless communications, including cell phone calls, GPS systems, Wi-Fi networks, and emergency communications.



C.T.S. Technology has been subjected to an investigation by the FCC's Enforcement Bureau, resulting in the Commission's proposal to impose a fine of $34,912,500. This penalty is being considered due to the company's marketing of 285 jammer models within the United States.


The company was directed by the FCC to guarantee that its marketing adheres to federal law. Despite not responding to the proposed fine, referred to as a "Notice of Apparent Liability," the company has subsequently implemented various measures to align its marketing practices with the U.S. laws that prohibit the marketing, sale, and importation of signal jammers.


The Commission did not receive any evidence from C.T.S. Technology to challenge the findings of the proposed fine. Therefore, yesterday's decision, which was a formal forfeiture order, upheld the full proposed fine against the company.



But collecting that money may be difficult.


Due to C.T.S. failing to acknowledge receipt of the NAL, the FCC reached out to the Chinese government to issue the NAL, as allowed by international law.


However, China's designated service affairs agency disregarded the agency's request and concluded that a forfeiture filing was suitable.


C.T.S. must make payment within 30 days. The FCC has not disclosed any further steps that will be taken in the event of non-payment.


コメント数:(0) カテゴリ:fcc  12:25:39
2024-05-14 15:16:44

The use of unapproved devices that disrupt cell phone signals has been flagged by the FCC as a potential security hazard.


The sale of "signal jammer" - devices capable of disrupting cell phone calls, text messages, Wi-Fi networks, and GPS systems - has caught the attention of the Federal Communications Commission (FCC), prompting concerns about potential disturbances in public places.


The small, battery-powered devices can be used to create "dead zones" within a small area, usually 30 feet or so, and have been used by movie theaters, restaurants, and schools to keep people off their cell phones. But they also cut off 911 calls, can disrupt navigation near airports, and have been used near police stations to interrupt radio communications. Officials at the FCC say they've noticed an increasing number of cell phone jammer, which are banned by federal law, coming into the country. Many cheaper versions, which sell for as little as $25, are imported from Asia, according to the agency.


The Communications Act of 1934 strictly prohibits the sale, advertising, usage, or importation of jammers, as it is illegal to disrupt radio communications in public places.


As per the FCC, jammers were promoted on the site in Orlando, Philadelphia, Austin, Mississippi, Charlotte, N.C., Washington, D.C., Cincinnati, and Corpus Christi, Texas. Officials have stated that they do not see any connection between the cases.


The FCC's enforcement bureau chief, Michele Ellison, pointed out that the simple action of posting an ad for a signal jammer on websites such as Craigslist.org is breaking federal law. Signal jammers are considered contraband for a particular reason.


In line with the citations, the majority of sellers promoted jammers as a way to enjoy an undisturbed nap while traveling on a bus, maintain a quiet educational setting, or create a peaceful environment, without mentioning the potential for misuse of the device.


As mentioned in one of the citations, there is an increasing concern about the limited comprehension of individual consumers who operate jamming devices regarding the serious consequences that may arise. These operators mistakenly believe that their illegal use of jammers is justified by personal convenience or should be pardoned.


The FCC has indicated that there was at least one seller who had knowledge of jammers being classified as contraband.


Keith Grabowski allegedly advertised a "cell phone jammer, wifi jammer" on the Philadelphia Craigslist, with a price tag of $300. In the ad, he acknowledges the limited details disclosed about the item due to its nature. He emphasizes that the jammer is not a toy and expresses his intention to dispose of it as quickly as possible.



His citation reveals that the ad created by Mr. Grabowski suggests his awareness of the sensitive and potentially illegal nature of the device he was selling on Craigslist.


The establishment of the "Jammer Tip Line" by the FCC allows individuals to easily inform the bureau about any suspected cases of jammer sales or usage, ensuring efficient reporting and investigation of such activities.


It was announced by Ellison that we have a firm determination to increase the severity of our enforcement actions against violators. Any individuals caught selling or operating a jammer will face costly consequences.





コメント数:(0) カテゴリ:fcc Cell Phone  15:16:44
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